CALL: Haruki Murakami: Challenging Authors

Series: Critical Literacy Teaching Series: Challenging Authors and Genres

Sense Publishers

Volume: Haruki Murakami: Challenging Authors

Editors, Matthew Carl Strecher and P. L. Thomas

Timeline

Proposals due: June 30, 2015 [EXTENDED]

Email to paul.thomas@furman.edu 100-word chapter proposal, 50-word author(s) bio(s), contact information, and 8 key words by above due date.

Accepted chapter notified: June 30, 2015

Accepted chapters due: October 31, 2015 

Final draft submission: December 15, 2015

Overview

Japanese writer Haruki Murakami has achieved a rare status among writers—incredible popularity in his native country and world-wide as well as rising critical acclaim. Murakami, in fact, in addition to receiving most of the major literary awards in Japan, as well as many around the world, has been nominated several times for the Nobel Prize, and is likely to be Japan’s next Nobel laureate in literature.  At the same time, his relationship with the Japanese literary community proper (known as the Bundan) has not been a particularly friendly one.

Writing about Murakami’s Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, Matthew Carl Strecher (2014) notes that one of Murakami’s central and enduring themes is a persistent warning not to suppress our fundamental desires in favor of the demands of society at large. And while Murakami’s writing over his career reveals some recurring motifs, his message has also evolved, creating a catalogue of works that reveal Murakami to be a challenging author.

Many of those challenges lie in Murakami’s blurring of genre as well as his rich blending of Japanese and Western mythologies and styles—all while continuing to offer narratives that attract and captivate a wide range of readers.  A highly challenging author, Murakami is, as Ōe Kenzaburō once contended, not a “Japanese writer” so much as a global one, and as such, he merits a central place in the classroom in order to confront readers and students, but also to be challenged as well.

This volume seeks to offer 15-20 chapters examining Murakami against the problems of genre and form, within cultural and national ideologies and mythologies, and spurred by the tensions that arise from being both popular and critically acclaimed.

Analyzing and considering teaching Murakami through the lenses of critical pedagogy and literacy offers another layer of complexity to the Murakami phenomenon and expands the scope of this series significantly, notably in the context of Freire (2005):

One of the violences perpetuated by illiteracy is the suffocation of the consciousness and the expressiveness of men and women who are forbidden from reading and writing, thus limiting their capacity to write about their reading of the world so they can rethink about their original reading of it. (p. 2)

Reading, teaching, and studying Murakami serves well the goal of rethinking this world.  It will open new lines of inquiry into what constitutes national literatures, and how some authors, in the era of blurred national and cultural boundaries, seek now to transcend those boundaries and pursue a truly global mode of expression.

References

Freire, P. (2005). Teachers as cultural workers: Letters to those who dare to teach. (D. Macedo, D. Koike, & A. Oliveira, Trans.). Boulder, CO: Westview.

Strecher, M.C. (2014). The forbidden worlds of Haruki Murakami. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Working Table of Contents

Name/contact title
Foreword
P.L. Thomas Introduction
Matthew Carl Strecher The Chronicles of Murakami Haruki and the Chamber of Secrets
P.L. Thomas Magical Murakami Nightmares: Investigating Genre through The Strange Library
Yuji Kato The Memories of Our Old “Murakami Haruki” and the Teaching Experience of “Haruki Murakami” in Classrooms in Tokyo Today
Tomoki Wakatsuki The Haruki phenomenon and everyday cosmopolitanism: belonging as a ‘citizen of the world’
Chikako Nihei Leaving Behind the Label of ‘Un-Japanese Author’: Reading ‘Mirror’ in Japanese Class
Rebecca Suter Between Self and Other: Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World As Cultural Engagement Through Fantasy
Deirdre Flynn The Trancreation of Tokyo: The Universality of Murakami’s Urban Landscape
Jonathan Dil What’s wrong with these people?: The Anatomy of Dependence in Norwegian Wood
Daisuke Kiriyama Exchanging “Far-From-Avant-garde” Jazz Records: Haruki Murakami’s “Nausea 1979” as Historiographic Metafiction
Matthew Carl Strecher Conclusion

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s